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Welcome to Gateway Garden Center's Plant Database. We are in the process of building our Database therefore it is far from complete. If you do not see a specific plant, please call us at 302-239-2727 to inquire about availability.

Plants are for sale at our Hockessin retail store only, based on availability. As you browse the Database, use the Garden Planner to create a printable list of plants that interest you. Bring your list to Gateway and we will help you with your plant selections.

We are sorry that we do not ship or accept orders over the internet.


 

Select Plant Type:
Botanical Name     Common Name
A B C D E F-G H I J-L M-O P Q R S T U-Z ALL
Abelia xgrandiflora
Common Name: Glossy Abelia
Semi-evergreen glossy leaves. Bright white fragrant flowers held on graceful arching branches from June to frost. Reddish-pink bracts remain through the fall and winter. New foliage in bronze in early spring. Great foundation shrub.

Abelia xgrandiflora 'Edward Goucher'
Common Name: Edward Goucher Abelia
Member of the Honeysuckle family. Semi-evergreen shrub with very fragrant light pink flowers. Great foundation shrub.

Abelia xgrandiflora 'Little Richard'
Common Name: Abelia
Semi-evergreen dwarf version of Abelia xgrandiflora. Glossy evergreen leaves with white fragrant flowers June to frost on a compact shrub. New leaves are bronze in color in early spring. Reddish-pink flower bracts are retained in fall and winter. Great foundation shrub.

Abelia xgrandiflora 'Mardi Gras'
Common Name: Variegated Abelia
Semi-evergreen glossy green, white, and pink variegated foliage with white fragrant flowers on a compact shrub. Flowers from June to frost. Bronze-pink foliage is more pronounced in early spring. Reddish-pink flower bracts are held through fall and winter. Great foundation shrub.

Abelia xgrandiflora 'Rose Creek'
Common Name: Abelia
One of the smallest Abelias to date. Semi-evergreen glossy green foliage with white fragrant flowers on a very compact shrub. Flowers from June to frost. Bronze-pink foliage is more pronounced in early spring. Reddish-pink flower bracts are held through fall and winter. Great foundation plant.

Abelia xgrandiflora 'Silver Anniversery'
Common Name: Variegated Abelia
Semi-evergreen glossy green and cream edge variegated foliage with white fragrant flowers on a compact shrub. Flowers from June to frost. Bronze-pink foliage is more pronounced in early spring. Reddish-pink flower bracts are held through fall and winter. Great foundation shrub.

Abies balsamea 'Nana'
Common Name: Dwarf Balsam Fir

Abies nordmanniana
Common Name: Nordmann Fir
Dense pyramidal form of fir tree whose branches tend to droop fully clothing the base of the tree.A stately and elegant fir tree. The needles are flat and thick with a notch in the end and when crushed they emit an orange-peel fragrance.

Acanthus mollis
Common Name: Common Bear's Breeches
The glossy leaves of this plant, carved into the temple columns of ancient Greece, are a fitting backdrop to the beautiful flower spikes of white and purple that arise in late spring.

Acanthus spinosus
Common Name: Spiny Bear's Breeches
This species of bear's breeches is a clump-forming perennial which is grown as much for its attractive foliage as for its architecturally bold flower spikes. Features pure white, snapdragon-like flowers enclosed by spiny, mauve-purple bracts and arranged in vertical rows on substantial flower spikes which rise well above the foliage mound to 3-4' tall. Blooms from late spring into mid summer. Deeply-cut, arching, glossy green, spiny, thistle-like leaves (2-3' long) form an ornamental mound of long-stalked, basal foliage which usually remains attractive throughout the growing season.

Acer circinatum
Common Name: Vine Maple

This Maple is perfect for a small garden! Its light green leaves are round, wide and lobed offering superb cover and nesting sites for many native birds. Small white flowers bloom in early April providing early nectar for local native bees and butterflies. Amazingly colorful fall foliage show!


Acer griseum
Common Name: Paper Bark Maple
Plant a specimen of the beautiful Paperbark Maple where its many features will provide drama throughout the year: in winter, massive branches that thicken with age display exquisitely peeling, orange-copper bark; in spring and summer, trifoliate leaves of rich green provide shade; and in fall, they change to brilliant red. Compact size, good health and hardiness also recommend this tree. Native to China. (Iseli Nursery)

Acer japonicum 'Aconitifolium'
Common Name: Fernleaf Fullmoon Maple
A low branched, small garden tree with deeply cut leaves, the Fernleaf Fullmoon Maple is dark-green in summer. Then in fall, the foliage turns a magnificent array of intense colors; brilliant scarlet shading into purple. Prominent red seeds also contribute to the show. (Iseli Nursery)

Acer palmatum 'Bloodgood'
Common Name: Japanese Red Maple
A deservedly popular Japanese Maple, this robust, upright tree has large, deep red leaves that push bright red in spring. Leaves mature to deep, rich purple and retain their color well, even during the heat of summer. Crimson fall color and scarlet, winged seeds add extra interest to this sturdy garden standard.

Acer palmatum 'Butterfly'
Common Name: Variegated Japanese Maple
This vase-shaped tree has small, dainty, variegated (blue-green and white) leaves with a light tinge of pink. In fall, the creamy margins become a blazing magenta. Consider this elegant tree for a dramatic entry planting in full sun or light shade. (Iseli Nursery)

Acer palmatum 'Crimson Queen'
Common Name: Lace Leaf Japanese Red Maple
Sculptural, cascading branches and finely dissected, colorful leaves make this classic selection one of the finest of the deep red laceleafs. Foliage emerges bright crimson, deepens to burgundy in summer and finishes with brilliant scarlet in fall, maintaining its color despite summer heat and humidity. The elegant, mounding plant produces a dense, broadly spreading structure that makes a dramatic impact near water, on a bank or in a courtyard scene.(Iseli Nursery)

Acer palmatum 'Emperor One'
Common Name: Japanese Maple
In spring, the leaves of this vigorous tree emerge deep purple-red. They retain the strong red, even tolerating the heat of summer, although shaded inner leaves may appear green. Dark red dominates the fall leaf color, and distinctive, almost black, bark stands out in winter. Discovered and developed by Richard P. Wolfe, Media, Pennsylvania.

Acer palmatum 'Fireglow'
Common Name: Japanese Red Maple
The bright red leaves of 'Fireglow' have a luminescent quality and the best summer color retention of all upright, red palmatums. An intense cherry glow appears in fall. This well-branched Japanese Maple has a moderate growth habit and a broad crown in maturity, so it is appropriate for shading small courtyards and patios. Introduced by Fratelli Gilardelli Nursery, near Milan, Italy. (Iseli Nursery)

Acer palmatum 'Garnet'
Common Name: Lace Leaf Japanese Red Maple
Rich, red-purple foliage distinguishes this vigorous, spreading laceleaf, and its large, broadly dissected leaves maintain their color well despite heat and humidity. With a more upright habit than other mounding types, it is among the largest, so its handsome stature can be used to make a dynamic contribution to larger garden spaces, serving as a focal point or part of a mixed planting. Received Award of Garden Merit from the Royal Horticultural Society. (Iseli Nursery)

Acer palmatum 'Inaba Shidare'
Common Name: Lace Leaf Japanese Red Maple
One of the most vigorous of the laceleafs, this dense, cascading tree displays large, rich, purple-red leaves that hold their color well through summer. In fall, bright-red foliage glows against the lowering sun, and in winter, the distinctive tree shows off bare branches and a silhouette typical of a red dissectum.(Iseli Nursery)

Acer palmatum 'Kamagata'
Common Name: Kamagata Japanese Maple
This small, bushy Japanese Maple produces a dense array of branches and finely textured foliage, qualities that make it ideal for courtyard plantings, containers and bonsai. Small, green spring leaves are decorated with red margins; summer leaves are light green; fall changes them again to yellow–orange with an occasional touch of red.(Iseli Nursery)

Acer palmatum 'Kotonoito'
Common Name: Harpstring Japanese Maple
The name 'Koto-no-Ito' means "harp strings", a reference to the string-like quality of this Japanese Maple's narrow, deeply divided leaf lobes.  It also has a dense, twiggy branch structure that works as the harp frame. The unique, divided leaves have a tinge of red in spring, stay green during summer and change to yellow in fall. Bright green bark and a graceful, elegant form carry the show in winter. (Iseli Nursery)

Acer palmatum 'Omurayama'
Common Name: Omurayama Japanese Maple
Spectacular color, highly dissected foliage and an elegant, cascading habit distinguish 'Omurayama' as one of the best of the Japanese Maples. The leaves are nearly as divided as laceleaf cultivars, and the fall display of reds and golds is as dramatic as any. The noteworthy ornamental tree will command attention in gardens large and small. Full to filtered sun produces the best look. (Iseli Nursery)

Acer palmatum 'Orange Dream'
Common Name: Orange Dream Japanese Maple
Unusual and infrequently found in the trade, this Japanese Maple cultivar offers both unique form and color. Its upright habit produces a large shrub or a small tree, either of which boasts bright green bark. Plants also show off a chorus of leaf color in shades of pink to orange to yellow that changes from spring through fall. This selection appreciates afternoon shade. (Iseli Nursery)

Acer palmatum 'Rising Sun'
Common Name: Japanese Red Maple
Rising Sun' is a recent Iseli selection with uncommonly large, heavily textured leaves---up to 8" across---that give the tree a tropical look. Its vigorous, multi-branched habit produces sturdy limbs and rigid twigs, and the autumn show of red, yellow, and orange will take your breath away. (Iseli Nursery)

Acer palmatum 'Tamukeyama'
Common Name: Laceleaf leaf Japanese Red Maple
First listed in 1710 in Japan, this extremely vigorous cultivar of superior quality has survived the test of time. Long, cascading branches produce spring foliage that is bright crimson and summer foliage that turns dark, purple-red and retains its color even in hot, humid summers. In fall, the rediscovered tree's foliage, which is bold and more coarsely dissected than other selections, changes to scarlet. The wider-than-tall cultivar performs beautifully by a water feature or enriching a Japanese style garden.(Iseli Nursery)

Acer palmatum 'Tsuma Gaki'
Common Name: Tsuma Gaki Japanese Red Maple (Red Nail)
In spring, the soft, pendant chartreuse leaves on this small, rounded tree sport dramatic edges of persimmon red, an effect that looks like many dainty leaf-hands with brightly painted "nails", In summer, the foliage continues to demand attention as it develops wide, deep-red margins and light-cream centers.

Acer rubrum 'Autumn Flame'
Common Name: Red Maple

Acer rubrum 'Red Sunset'
Common Name: Red Maple

Dense clusters of red flowers in late winter offer nectar early in the season. Cardinals, chipmunks and squirrels eat the red, winged "helicopter" fruits. The stems and twigs are reddish; the buds are red; and, in fall, the leaves turn orange-red. 'Red Sunset' is one of the best cultivars available, with outstanding orange to red fall color. Swamp red maple grows faster than Norway and sugar maples, but slower than silver maple.

Benefits:

  • First tree to bloom, drawing all kinds of pollinators
  • Insect eating birds visit the tree to feed on the pollinators
  • Seeds are great food for birds and chipmunks
  • Provides cover and nest sites for all kinds of birds
  • Outstanding fall color and grows in wet soil

Acer saccharum
Common Name: Sugar Maple

Sugar maple has a dense, rounded crown and is one of the trees responsible for giving New England its reputation for spectacular fall color, as the medium green leaves turn brilliant yellow or red-orange in autumn. The familiar two-winged "helicopter" fruit is a favorite food of chipmunks, and they store it away in winter larders. This is a long-lived tree that grows relatively slowly.

Acer shirasawanum 'Aureum'
Common Name: Golden Fullmoon Maple
The Golden Full Moon Maple is highly regarded for its beautifully shaped, colorful leaves. Especially in spring, the small, slow-growing, garden tree displays outstanding, glowing color. Yellow-green leaves brighten shadier spots through summer, before putting on orange and red hues in fall. Protect this maple from intense sunlight. (Iseli Nursery)

Achillea millefolium 'Apricot Delight'
Common Name: Yarrow
Vibrant salmon-pink flowers are consistent in color and resistant to fading. This long-flowering cultivar has a compact habit with sturdy stems. The soft fern-like foliage forms a dense mat that looks great especially if spent flowers are removed. Flowers can be used fresh for arrangements or harvested and dried for later use. A robust grower with very few pest or pathogen problems.

Achillea millefolium 'Coronation Gold'
Common Name: Yarrow
Clear yellow flowers arise from sturdy stems from June-August. Makes excellent cut flowers in both dried and fresh arrangments. A tough, deer-resistant plant with aromatic leaves. Often re-flowers in fall when spent flowers are removed. This hybrid was introduced more than a half century ago to commemorate the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II and, fittingly, it is a regal addition to every garden.

Achillea millefolium 'Pretty Belinda'
Common Name: Yarrow
Noted for its lilac-pink flowers, ferny aromatic foliage, and compact size, this selection would make a wonderful addition to your garden. Stems of the compact 'Pretty Belinda' do not tend to flop as much as some of the taller A. millefolium cultivars. Consider cutting back plant stems to lateral flower buds after initial flowering to tidy the planting and encourage repeat bloom. Plants may be cut back to basal foliage after bloom.

Achillea millefolium 'Red Velvet'
Common Name: Yarrow
Deep cherry-red flowers on 20" stems are great for dried and cut flowers. The soft, fern-like foliage forms a dense weed-blocking carpet, especially when spent flowers are removed, to continue the aesthetic value of this low-maintenance gem even after the flowering has finished. Great for edging perennial borders!

Achillea x 'Apple Blossom'
Common Name: Yarrow
Soft rosy-pink flowers begin in late spring and attract butterflies. The soft fern-like foliage forms a dense mat that looks great especially if spent flowers are removed. Flowers can be used fresh for arrangements or harvested and dried for later use. This tough, floriferous beauty is a must for every perennial border, with very few pest or pathogen problems.

Achillea x 'Fireland (Feuerland)'
Common Name: Yarrow
Common yarrow is a carefree garden plant that spreads easily to fill available space. 'Fireland' is a vigorous grower with brick red flowers that fade to deep orange throughout the summer. Named for Tierra del Fuego, the land of fire. Introduced by Ernst Pagels. An excellent cut flower!

Achillea x 'Moonshine'
Common Name: Moonshine Yarrow
Silver foliage with 3' tall stems topped with broad sulphur-yellow flower heads. A hybrid of A. x 'Taygeta' and A. clypeolata, introduced by Alan Bloom in the 1950's. An excellent choice for a hot dry site, especially if it's windy. A beautiful cut flower!

Achillea x 'Oertel's Rose'
Common Name: Yarrow
Common yarrow is a carefree garden plant that spreads easily to fill available space. 'Oertel's Rose' is rosy pink with good strong color that is slow to fade. It is shorter than other selections at 18" and a very vigorous grower. Selected by Goodness Grows nursery in Lexington, GA, it is an excellent selection for the heat and humidity of the southeast, and has done beautifully here in Pennsylvania as well.

Achillea x 'Paprika'
Common Name: Yarrow
Intense red flowers surround bright yellow centers. This Achillea is a vigorous grower that will quickly form a dense weed-blocking mat. It is one of the most floriferous of the Achillea cultivars, presenting a solid block of red in early summer. An easy and rewarding production plant, it has very few pest or pathogen problems.

Achillea x 'Summer Wine'
Common Name: Yarrow
Common yarrow is a carefree garden plant that spreads easily to fill available space. 'Summer Wine' is a vigorous grower with deep wine-colored flowers that fade to rose pink throughout the summer. An excellent cut flower!

Achillea x 'Terra Cotta'
Common Name: Yarrow
Another Ernest Pagel introduction, with pronounced silvery foliage. Sturdy stems support bright peach flowers that slowly turn to rich hues of earthy reds and oranges. An excellent cut flower!

Achillea x lewisii 'King Edward'
Common Name: Dwarf Wooly Yarrow
Excellent choice for a rock garden, or in pockets on a stone wall. A consistent groundcover with interesting texture. The leaves make a woolly mass only an inch or two high. Many spectacular soft yellow flowers are produced in early to mid summer to a maximum height of only 6"-8". Foliage is scented when crushed.

Acinos alpinus
Common Name: Rock Thyme, Alpine Calamint

Clusters of tubular purplish flowers appear at the end of each stem from late May through early June.  Forms tufts of tiny, fragrant, semi-evergreen leaves reaching only 6” tall. Very floriferous and attracts butterflies and other pollinators. Drought tolerant once established. A superb rock garden, wall garden, container, and trough garden plant.


Aconitum carmichaelii 'Arendsii'
Common Name: Monkshood
One of the tallest monkshoods, easily standing at 4’ in flower, plants bear large flowers of an intense blue in September and October on sturdy, self-supporting stems. ‘Arendsii’ is one of the best late flowering monkshoods. Makes an excellent cut flower, but care should be taken not to get any sap on open wounds.

Aconitum carmichaelii 'Cloudy'
Common Name: Monkshood
An interesting new monkshood cultivar with bi-colored flowers of blue and white. The relatively large flowers appear in late summer to early fall. Makes an excellent cut flower, but care should be taken not to get any sap on open wounds.

Aconitum fischeri
Common Name: Azure Monkshood
Dark azure-blue flowers appear in mid-late summer and continue into early fall, making this a perfect companion plant for Japanese anemones and ‘Autumn Joy’ sedums. Makes an excellent cut flower, but care should be taken not to get any sap on open wounds.

Aconitum napellus
Common Name: Common Monkshood
The classic monkshood of your grandmother’s garden, this proven garden favorite is perfect for cutting gardens, perennial borders, and cottage gardens. Makes an excellent cut flower, but care should be taken not to get any sap on open wounds.

Aconitum x 'Blue Lagoon'
Common Name: Dwarf Monkshood
A dwarf hybrid monkshood that has violet-blue flowers borne above the attractive foliage. Makes an excellent cut flower, but care should be taken not to get any sap on open wounds.

Acorus americanus
Common Name: Sweetflag
Acorus americanus is a hardy perennial swamp or bog plant with sweet, spicy-scented leaves. Spadix like flowers appear in June and July, followed by dark berries. Found at water's edge from Nova Scotia to Virginia to Washington to Alaska. Great for stabilizing pond edges or filling a boggy area.

Acorus gramineus 'Variegatus'
Common Name: Variegated Sweet Flag
Variegated Sweet Flag has grass-like foliage with a slowly spreading growth habit. Its 8-10" blades form fans like those of Iris and will remain evergreen in warmer climates. The flowers are inconspicuous and the plants are grown mainly for their foliage. Sweet Flag likes boggy conditions and can be grown in shallow water at pond edge, but is also at home in an average garden, though less vigorous. A great choice for a spiky texture in mixed containers!

Actaea racemosa
Common Name: Black Cohosh, Fairy Candle
The beautifully delicate, airy flowers of this woodland native arise elegantly above the foliage in June and July. It typically grows to a total height (foliage plus flowering spikes) of 4-6', but under optimum conditions can reach 8' tall. The numerous small, creamy white, fragrant flowers appear in long, terminal racemes resembling fluffy spires (typically 1-2' long) rising well above the foliage on wiry stems.

Actaea rubra
Common Name: Red Baneberry

Red Baneberry is a lovely woodland native with fine-textured foliage and a light and airy texture. Its lacy leaves resemble those of Astilbe and its similar needs make it a great native substitute. In late spring and early summer lightly scented, delicate white flowers appear above the foliage. Flowers give way to clusters of bright red berries in late summer that are attractive to mammals and many songbirds. Planted in groups, it is a lovely groundcover and it combines well with other woodland natives such as Wild Ginger and Wood Ferns.

Actaea simplex 'Black Negligee'
Common Name: Purple-leaved Bugbane
'Black Negligee' is a purple-leaved bugbane that typically grows to 4-5' tall. It is perhaps best noted for its deeply-cut, dark purplish-black leaves on branched, dark stems. Foliage has a lacy effect, hence the cultivar name, and makes an effective accent throughout the growing season. Small, numerous, creamy white (with a purple tinge), strongly fragrant flowers appear in late summer to early fall in long, bottlebrush-like, terminal racemes resembling fluffy spires (to 24" long).

Adiantum pedatum
Common Name: Northern Maidenhair Fern
Dainty bright green fronds are held aloft on shiny black stems creating a light, airy texture in the woodland garden. In rich soil and bright shade it will spread by shallow rhizomes to form a dense groundcover. Found in the humus-rich woodlands and moist woods of Eastern North America. Easy to grow as long as the soil is loose and rich.

Adiantum pedatum
Common Name: Maidenhair Fern

Dainty bright green fronds are held aloft on shiny black stems creating a light, airy texture in the woodland garden. In rich soil and bright shade it will spread by shallow rhizomes to form a dense groundcover. Found in the humus-rich woodlands and moist woods of Eastern North America. Easy to grow as long as the soil is loose and rich.

Aethionema grandiflorum
Common Name: Persian Stonecress
Mounding plants with bluish-green foliage are covered with clusters of pink flowers for many weeks in late spring. This alpine plant is native to the higher elevations of Persia (modern day Iran) and is a wonderful addition to a sunny rock garden, wall garden, or planted in front of a perennial border. If planted in well-drained soil of average moisture, these tough plants are long-lived and can become semi-woody at the base.

Agastache astromontana
Common Name: Anise Hyssop
It delights with sweetly scented foliage and rosy pink spikes that seem to last forever - the calyces are the same color as the petals and last long after the flowers have dropped. This is the most compact of the group, with a tight rounded habit. Great for container growing!

Agastache rugosa 'Honey Bee Blue'
Common Name:
True to name, this selection is a magnate for bees, butterflies, and other beneficial insects, with intense blue flowers and aromatic gray-green foliage. The sweetly fragrant, tubular flowers in whorls bloom on erect, salvia-like spikes atop 2'-3' stems. Flowers appear over a long summer bloom period.

Agastache rupestris
Common Name: Rock Anise Hyssop
Licorice Plant, so nicknamed by Dr. Allan Armitage, of the University of Georgia for the deliciously scented foliage - mmmm - rub the foliage! Striking warm rosy orange verticillate flowers with silvery foliage sets this plant apart. It is upright, somewhat shrubby and quite cold tolerant. This is an outstanding plant, in flower from June until killing frost. Championed by Panayoti Kelaidis of the Denver Botanic Gardens.

Agastache x 'Black Adder'
Common Name: Black Adder Hyssop
The second fantastic Agastache given to us by Coen Jansen, Black Adder boasts numerous bottlebrush flowers of vivid blue from mid summer to frost on a compact, rounded plant. It has been hardy for us in the ground and in containers for 5 years now and has proven to be a reliable production plant as well. An early pinch keeps it more compact in pots.

Agastache x 'Blue Fortune'
Common Name: Anise Hyssop
Selected for its profusion of long lasting, deep violet blue flower spikes, that appear from July to September and fragrant foliage. Prefers average to dry locations, and is a butterfly magnet. Bred (A. foeniculum x A. rugosa) and selected by Gert Fortgens of the Arboretum Trompenberg, in Rotterdam. Agastache 'Blue Fortune' is long flowering, heat and drought tolerant, as well as insect and disease resistant. Blue Fortune is a hybrid of species native to the US and Korea.

Agastache x 'Firebird'
Common Name: Anise Hyssop
'Firebird' is a prolific bloomer, covered with deep orange red flowers from mid summer until frost. It is a cross between A. coccinea and A. rupestris, hybridized by Richard Dufresne of North Carolina. An excellent choice for containers, raised beds and rock gardens. A favorite of butterflies and hummingbirds. For us this has been a very reliable returner when given good drainage.

Agastache x 'Golden Jubilee'
Common Name:
Definately a WOW! plant. Chartruse Coleus-like foliage is incredible on its own, but the blue bottlebrush flowers in mid summer top it off beautifully. Very hardy and will self sow. Benefits from a little shade in production to protect leaf color.

Agastache x 'Pink Panther'
Common Name: Anise Hyssop
Tall flower spikes, beginning in mid-summer and continuing until frost, are a big draw for butterflies and hummingbirds. The licorice-scented foliage enhances the charm of the flowers when used in seasonal arrangements.

Agastache x 'Purple Haze'
Common Name:
This decidedly hardy Agastache brings a new color palette with its long racemes of smoky blue violet flowers that never seem to stop coming. It remains compact in a container with an early pinch and is in flower from July to frost. It has survived wet and dry, and warm and cold winters in Pennsylvania where it has been in the ground since Spring 2000. Hardiness beyond zone 6 is unknown.

Agastache x 'Red Fortune'
Common Name: Anise hyssop
Similar to Blue Fortune only in name, the "red" version is still a worthy plant in spite of its misfortunate moniker, with its continuous flowering and numerous deep rose flower spikes beginning in late June and continuing until the first hard frost. It's still blooming at Thanksgiving here! Just call it a dwarf 'Tutti Frutti' and enjoy it. As with other Agastaches, very attractive to hummingbirds and butterflies of all types. An Agastache mexicana hybrid. Patent held by Future Plants.

Agastache x 'Tutti Frutti'
Common Name: Hyssop
'Tutti Frutti' has bright lavender pink flowers all summer. A vigorous and trouble-free grower, it is an excellent choice for the middle or back of the border. If it gets consistent moisture, it may reach 5 feet. A favorite of butterflies and hummingbirds. In containers it benefits from one or two early cut backs. A strong bloomer, it will quickly recover from a trim. A. barberi x A. mexicana.

Ajania pacifica
Common Name: Silver and Gold
This mound-forming, rhizomatous perennial is prized for its attractive, variegated foliage which lasts all season. It typically forms a dense foliage mound to 18-24" tall that spreads over time by rhizomes to as much as 36" wide. During much of the growing season, this plant serves as an excellent ground cover featuring silver-margined leaves with silvery undersides (to 2" long). Silver and Gold is often primarily grown for its foliage, which works well in containers, in the perennial border, or as a ground cover. Though flowers are not as showy as florists' chrysanthemums, the numerous small, button-like, golden yellow flowers appear as a welcome burst of color in the late-autumn landscape. Somewhat drought tolerant when established.

Ajuga reptans 'Black Scallop'
Common Name: Bugleweed
Black Scallop is a stoloniferous, mat-forming, bugleweed cultivar that is noted for its (1) dark maroon-purple leaves with scalloped margins, (2) fragrant dark violet flowers and (3) compact but spreading habit. Leaves are varyingly described as dark maroon-purple to near black, which gets the point across that these leaves are in fact very dark in color. Leaves appear in spreading rosettes that form a 3-4" tall foliage carpet that may spread over time to 36" wide. Tiny, two-lipped, dark violet flowers (typical of the mint family) appear in late spring on flower spikes that rise above the foliage. Flowers are attractive to early butterflies and other beneficial pollinators.

Ajuga reptans 'Bronze Beauty'
Common Name: Bugleweed
Excellent ground cover that spreads to approximately 3' wide and only reaching a height of 4-6" tall. Forms a compact, weed-blocking mat that grows equally well below shrubs, around rocks, or in troublesome shady locations. Blue flowers in spring on 6" tall spikes are a favorite of bees and the earliest butterflies. Attractive, bronze foliage is most vivid in the cooler temperatures of spring and fall but looks great all year. Semi-evergreen. Foliage may show more green than bronze in very dense shade or during very hot, humid times. Spreads by stolons, but is not invasive.

Ajuga reptans 'Burgandy Glow'
Common Name: Bugleweed
Like all Ajugas, 'Burgundy Glow' makes for an excellent ground cover in sun or shade. It features tricolored foliage with shades of cream, pink, and green. Blue flowers on 6" spikes arise above the foliage in late spring. In mass plantings, the flower effect can be very dramatic, like a blue wave. In fall, older leaves exhibit a deep bronze coloring while the younger leaves contrast well with lighter hues of rose.

Ajuga reptans 'Chocolate Chip'
Common Name: Bugleweed
Ajuga 'Valfredda', or Chocolate Chip, is a bugleweed cultivar that is most noted for its extremely dwarf habit and its chocolate foliage. It is perhaps best utilized as a small area ground cover. It typically forms a foliage mat to only 2" tall of tiny, shiny, oval leaves (1/2" across) which are chocolate with burgundy highlights. Typical bluish-purple Ajuga flowers appear in spring on spikes rising slightly above the foliage to 3" tall. When in full flower, plantings can produce a striking floral display, however this cultivar is primarily grown for its foliage and dwarf size.

Ajuga reptans 'Gaiety'
Common Name: Bugleweed
Ajuga 'Gaiety' is similar to A. 'Burgundy Glow', but exhibits much deeper burgundy foliage hues. Lilac flowers appear on 4-6" flower spikes and form a breathtaking wave of color in spring. A hardy, reliable ground cover that is equally at home in sun or nearly full shade. Flowers also are a favorite of pollinators such as bees and butterflies!

Ajuga reptans 'Jungle Beauty'
Common Name: Bugleweed
Huge, shiny, mahogany-purple leaves form an 8" mound of attractive foliage, topped with deep blue spikes, to 10" in May. Larger flowers than many cultivars of Ajuga, the floral display is not only stunning, it is a magnate for butterflies and bees. A ground-hugging, creeping plant that is quite useful as a ground cover or for containers. A vigorous grower for moist, rich soils.

Ajuga reptans 'Silver Queen'
Common Name:
Ajuga 'Silver Queen' is a very attractive ground cover with variegated foliage. Leaves are bluish-green with cream mottling. The foliage boasts a burgundy hue in spring. Blue flowers on 6" spikes arise above the foliage in late spring are a magnate for butterflies and bees. Also a great addition to containers!

Alcea rosea 'Chater's Newport Pink'
Common Name: Hollyhock

Beautiful variety of hollyhock with fully-double, pink flowers on sturdy stems. Perfect for the back of the border, as an accent plant, or for cutting gardens. Very hardy and drought tolerant once established.


Alcea rosea 'Chater's Purple'
Common Name: Hollyhock

Another beautiful variety of hollyhock in the Chater’s Series, this plant has fully-double, purplish-red flowers on sturdy stems. Perfect for the back of the border, as an accent plant, or for cutting gardens. Very hardy and drought tolerant once established.


Alcea rosea 'Chater's Scarlet'
Common Name: Hollyhock

A flower that is truly scarlet-red! This lovely gem is a beautiful variety of hollyhock with fully-double, scarlet flowers on sturdy stems. Perfect for the back of the border, as an accent plant, or for cutting gardens. Very hardy and drought tolerant once established.


Alcea rosea 'Chater's Yellow'
Common Name: Hollyhock

A cheery must for every garden! Another great variety of hollyhock in the Chater’s Series, this plant has fully-double, yellow flowers on sturdy stems. Perfect for the back of the border, as an accent plant, or for cutting gardens. Very hardy and drought tolerant once established.


Alcea rosea 'Nigra'
Common Name: Hollyhock

Striking hollyhock with deep purplish-maroon, nearly black, flowers on 4-6’ spikes. Individual flowers are nearly 4” wide and are most vivid when plants are placed in front of light-colored walls or fences. Flowers are great for summer bouquets and can add whimsical charm to any arrangement. Perfect for the back of the border, as an accent plant, or for cutting gardens. Very hardy and drought tolerant once established.


Alcea rosea 'Peaches 'N Dreams'
Common Name: Hollyhock

Exquisite double-flowered variety of hollyhock with peachy-yellow flowers blushed with pink. Perfect for the back of the border, as an accent plant, or for cutting gardens. Very hardy and drought tolerant once established.


Alcea rosea 'Powder Puffs'
Common Name: Hollyhock

An elegant variety of hollyhock with fully-double flowers in a mixture of colors including white, yellow, pink and red. Perfect for the back of the border, as an accent plant, or for cutting gardens. Very hardy and drought tolerant once established.


Alcea rugosa
Common Name: Russian Hollyhock

A robust species of hollyhock from Russia and Ukraine with clear-yellow flowers on hairy stems above deeply-lobed leaves. The classical features of this plant make it the perfect addition to cottage gardens; it is equally at home planted at the back of the border, as an accent plant, or in cutting gardens. Very hardy and drought tolerant once established. Much more perennial in habit than other hollyhock species.


Alchemilla mollis
Common Name: Lady's Mantle
Lady's mantle is an excellent clump-forming perennial that will grow almost anywhere. The dense foliar pubescence gives the leaves a velvety appearance that is soft to the touch, and is especially pretty after a soft rain when the captured water droplets glisten in the sun. The starry, chartreuse flowers are held above the foliage in spring and make long-lasting cut flowers. Great as an edging plant or as a ground cover when planted en masse.

Alchemilla mollis 'Auslese'
Common Name: Lady's Mantle
Green to bright chartreuse flowers appear in clusters above scalloped, grey-green foliage late spring through summer. Robust and vigorous, Alchemilla mollis 'Auslese' prefers full sun to part shade and has a wonderfully uniform habit.

Allium cernuum
Common Name: Nodding Onion
Found on ledges, in dry meadows, gravel, rocky or wooded slopes, this delicate onion has gently nodding pink flowers in late spring. Beautiful in the garden or naturalized in a meadow. Easy, dependable and very drought tolerant once established.

Allium cernuum
Common Name: Nodding Onion

Easy to identify by its distinctive, nodding, pastel lilac-pink flowers in late spring, Nodding Onion thrives in challenging sites such as hot sun and gravely soil. It is strikingly beautiful and is well-suited a formal or wild garden, as well as a natural meadow. Easy, dependable and very drought tolerant once established.

Alyssum wulfenianum
Common Name: Madwort

A wonderful spreading plant for the rock garden that is covered in bright yellow flowers in June. Grows only about 5-8” tall and up to 20” wide. Flowers produced in prostrate corymbs. Semi-evergreen, procumbent habit makes this an ideal specimen for any hot, dry nook, especially in rock gardens, wall gardens, along sidewalks, or in containers.


Amelanchier alnifolia
Common Name: Western Serviceberry

Clusters of fragrant white flowers emerge in early April just before the small, light-green, oval leaves appear attracting clouds of nectar seeking native butterflies. Small, sweet, blue berries ripen in summer and are loved by songbirds. Orange to red fall foliage is spectacular and long lasting.


Amelanchier canadensis
Common Name: Shadblow

One of the first native trees with showy flowers to bloom, serviceberry has slightly fragrant, white flowers in drooping clusters that are quite conspicuous because they appear before the leaves emerge. The nectar attracts butterflies and other pollinators. Flowers give rise to very flavorful, purple-black, berrylike fruits relished by both songbirds and people. Edible berries resemble blueberries in size and color and can be used in jams, jellies and pies. The colorful fall foliage is a blend of orange, gold, red and green.

Amelanchier laevis
Common Name: Allegheny Serviceberry
Allegheny Serviceberry is a native tree for all seasons. In April and May it has beautiful white flowers that are delicately scented and provide nectar for the season's early bees and butterflies. In mid summer its fruits ripen to brilliant violet pink, aging to deep blue purple when fully ripe. Its leaves play occasional host to the larvae of viceroy, striped hairstreak, and Canadian tiger swallowtail butterflies. And the grand finale comes in fall with brilliant oranges, yellows and reds as the leaves prepare to drop. Amelanchier laevis is found in moist woods and meadows, but tolerates most any garden situation. It will bloom more in full sun, but have a more open and graceful habit in shade. It is drought tolerant once established, but will grow taller and faster in consistently moist soils. Amelanchier can be grown as a small tree pruned to become a densely branched shrub.

Amorpha canescens
Common Name: Leadplant

Amorpha canescens is a small shrubby plant that is graced with long spikes of clear purple flowers from July to September. Its long bloom time and attractiveness to butterflies make Leadplant a great native substitute for Butterfly Bush (Buddleia).

Amsonia hubrichtii
Common Name: Thread-leaf Blue Star
A graceful and long lived native plant with very fine foliage, clusters of steel blue flowers in May and June on an upright, bushy plant. Excellent golden fall color. Thrives in full sun or part shade. No insect or pest problems with these babies. Found in Arkansas in 1942 by Leslie Hubricht.

Amsonia x 'Blue Ice'
Common Name: Blue Star
This long-blooming, compact Amsonia selected from A. tabernaemontana seedlings at White Flower Farm is possibly a hybrid with the taxonomically challenged A. montana or perhaps with the Asian Rhazya orientale. Whatever its parentage, Blue Ice blooms longer and stronger than the species and forms a dense, compact mound of dark green leaves that turn brilliant yellow in the fall. Looks fantastic in a gallon!

Anacyclus pyrethrum var. depressus 'Silberkissen'
Common Name: Mt. Atlas Daisy

Mt. Atlas daisy is a charming alpine plant originating from the romantic cliffs of the Atlas Mountains in Morocco, and forms a compact, spreading mat of fern-like divided grayish green leaves. ‘Silberkissen’ is even more compact than the species with mats only reaching 3-4” tall and spreading 9-12” wide, with grayish leaves covered in silvery hairs. Bears single daisy-like flowers (1” across) with yellow centers and white 'petals' with red undersides. The unique coloration of the flowers add much to the charm of the plant; in appearance, flowers almost look dipped in red blood, and for the imaginative plant connoisseur, they can almost evoke mental images of classical mythological stories of lore. Flowers close in the evenings and on cloudy days, and are borne in late spring and early summer. As a Mediterranean plant, Mt. Atlas daisy requires excellent drainage, and are ideally suited for hot, sunny, and dry rock gardens, trough gardens, rock walls, or rock crevices.


Anchusa azurea 'Loddon Royalist'
Common Name: Italian Alkanet

A coarse textured, clump-forming perennial with airy terminal spikes of deep blue, flowers (to ¾”) which resemble forget-me-nots in general appearance. Italian Alkanet is great for the back of the border or as an accent plant and adds a wonderful splash of color in the late spring/early summer garden. 'Loddon Royalist' is a great Anchusa cultivar that typically grows to 3' tall.


Andropogon gerardii
Common Name: Big Bluestem
The king of native grasses, Big Bluestem has handsome gray to blue-green stems in spring turning to green alternating with deep red in summer then to coppery red in fall. Three fingered seed heads top tall stems in August. Clump forming with excellent drought tolerance once established. Andropogon gerardii can be found in moist meadows and along side roads and rivers from Canada to Mexico.

Andropogon gerardii
Common Name:
The king of native grasses, Big Bluestem has handsome gray to blue-green stems in spring turning to green alternating with deep red in summer then to coppery red in fall. Three fingered seed heads top tall stems in August. Clump forming with excellent drought tolerance once established.

Andropogon virginicus
Common Name: Broom Sedge
An easy-to-grow clump forming native warm saeson grass with incredible golden copper fall color. A pioneer soil stabalizing plant that does well in poor, infertile areas and surprisingly in floodplains. It's wonderful for xeriscaping, in coastal areas, fall and winter cut stems and restoration.

Anemone blanda 'Blue Star'
Common Name: Grecian Windflower

‘Blue Star’ is a superb cultivar with large (2.5”), daisy-like flowers with showy, intensely blue sepals. The bluish foliage is deeply cut and fern-like. Plants will self-sow and the seedlings will bloom the second year. As heralds of spring, Grecian windflowers are one of the earliest flowers to emerge each year, just when cabin fever is the strongest! Great for rock gardens or for naturalizing in woodland areas.


Anemone blanda 'White Splendour'
Common Name: Grecian Windflower

‘White Splendour’ features lovely, single, daisy-like flowers (to 2”) with showy, creamy white sepals and yellow centers on plants reaching a height of only 4-6”. The foliage is deeply cut and fern-like. As heralds of spring, Grecian windflowers are one of the earliest flowers to emerge each year, just when cabin fever is the strongest! Great for rock gardens or for naturalizing in woodland areas.


Anemone canadensis
Common Name: Meadow Anemone
A strong growing plant that needs room to move. Clear white single flowers top out at 18" from mid spring to early summer. A robust and competitive plant that brightens up woodland edges and shady corners of the garden. Combines well with other spring-blooming perennials such as Polemonium, Sisyrinchium and Mertensia.

Anemone hupehensis var. japonica 'Pamina'
Common Name: Japanese Anemone

'Pamina' is an excellent Japanese anemone cultivar that bears semi-double, lavender to rose-pink flowers with yellow centers in late summer and fall. It is a vigorous, fibrous-rooted, compact grower that reaches a maximum height of 3’ tall and spreads by creeping rhizomes. Flowers appear on wiry stems above an attractive foliage mound of trifoliate dark green leaves.


Anemone hupehensis var. japonica 'Prince Henry'
Common Name: Japanese Anemone

This lovely Anemone boasts deep rose, semi-double flowers with star-shaped petals. It is also smaller than most of the hybrids, but it still typically stands between 24” and 30” tall. Flowering from late summer until fall, it is a superb addition to the perennial border or woodland garden.


Anemone hupehensis var. japonica 'September Charm'
Common Name: Japanese Anemone

‘September Charm’ certainly lives up to its name, producing numerous single, creamy rose-pink flowers with yellow centers on nodding stems to 3’ tall. Flowers are darker on the outside than their inside, making them even more endearing. Blooms profusely from August until frost.


Anemone palmata
Common Name: Cyclamen-Leaved Anemone

An unusual species in the American landscape, this Anemone bears golden-yellow flowers with golden centers, which is a rare color combination in the genus. The relatively large, saucer-shaped flowers are held above the basal, kidney-shaped foliage on diminutive 6” stems. Native to the Mediterranean regions of southwest Europe and northwest Africa, this species requires well drained soils and will not survive the winter with wet feet.


Anemone sylvestris
Common Name: Snowdrop Anemone
Delicate nodding white flowers in late spring atop lustrous green dense foliage. A low maintenance groundcover for bright shade! Easy to grow in containers, overwinters well in cold frames if protected from heavy rain and snow melt.

Anemone tomentosa 'Robustissima'
Common Name: Grapeleaf Anemone

‘Robustissima’ grows 24-30” tall and produces a plethora of single, light pink flowers with yellow centers beginning in August. Flowering most profusely from August to September, this garden favorite continues to flower sporadically until frost. It is an extremely robust and vigorous plant that is well suited for naturalizing. One of the most adaptable of the anemones. Being stoloniferous, new plantlets emerge in spring and should be thinned for best results.


Anemone x hybrida 'Honorine Jobert'
Common Name: Japanese Anemone

‘Honorine Jobert’ is a vigorous, fibrous-rooted, compact Japanese anemone hybrid which typically grows 3-4’ tall, spreading by creeping rhizomes. It bears single white flowers (2-3” across) with yellow centers on graceful, wiry stems over attractive dark green foliage mounds. This great cultivar was first discovered in the garden of its namesake M. Jobert in Verdun, France, in 1858. It has been highly popular in European gardens ever since and remains the most popular and highly sought after white anemone today. It is quite floriferous and flowers from August to late September.


Anemone x hybrida 'Party Dress'
Common Name: Japanese Anemone

‘Party Dress’ will certainly add an extra spark of glamour to your garden. With gorgeous, double rose-pink flowers (to 2”) produced prolifically from late summer until fall on tall stems (36-38” high), this cultivar can’t be beat. Flowers are ruffled like a petticoat and are nearly twice the size of many Japanese anemones.


Anemone x hybrida 'Queen Charlotte'
Common Name: Japanese Anemone

This somewhat compact, clump-forming Japanese anemone hybrid features large (3”), soft pink, semi-double flowers held above the mounded, dark-green foliage on graceful, wiry stems. It also has a long flowering season (from August to late September). The tips of the sepals have a delicately ragged appearance. It grows about 3’ tall and was bred by German nurseryman, Wilhelm Pfitzer. Naturalizes by root runners.


Anemone x hybrida 'Richard Ahrens'
Common Name: Japanese Anemone

This beautiful and vigorous garden jewel produces long-lasting single and semi-double blooms that open bright pink and soften to blushed-white as the season progresses. It starts blooming in early July and continues until late September on wiry 24-36” stems.


Anemone x hybrida 'Whirlwind'
Common Name: Japanese Anemone

‘Whirlwind’ is an exceptional hybrid anemone selection with large (4”), semi-double, pure white flowers with twisted tepals tinged in green. Flowers appear on wiry stems from late summer until frost. This popular, long-lived perennial with a woody base reaches 4-5’ tall! Staking may be necessary, especially to keep plants upright after a rain. Divide in fall or early spring. Slow to establish, but then spreads rapidly.


Anthyllis vulneraria var. coccinea
Common Name: Kidney Vetch, Woundwort

Produces a plethora of blooms in late spring that appear bicolored with clusters of bright red claw-shaped flowers surrounded by wooly, yellow calyxes. Attractive bluish-green foliage is covered with silky hairs. Reaching only 6-8” tall and thriving in poor soil in full sun, it is perfect for the sunny rock garden and containers.


Aquilegia canadensis
Common Name: Wild Columbine
Red flowers with yellow centers hang like drifts of softly illuminated lanterns in April and May. Excellent as a shady rock garden naturalizer, it also is quite content in average garden conditions. Occurs naturally in rich rocky woods, north-facing slopes, cliffs, ledges, pastures, and roadside banks. Native to all states east of the Rockies, but not found in Louisiana.

Aquilegia canadensis 'Corbett'
Common Name: Yellow Wild Columbine
Profuse show of butter yellow lantern flowers from April to May. Its short stature, delicate color and mid spring bloom time make it an ideal companion for spring bulbs! Spotted by Richard Simon of Bluemont Nurseries, Monkton, MD. Named for the nearby small town of Corbett.

Aquilegia canadensis 'Corbett'
Common Name: Wild Columbine

Versatile and easy to grow, 'Corbett' is a charming selection of our native Columbine with delicate light yellow flowers. More compact than the species, 'Corbett' is about a foot tall and heavily branched, sporting many flowers on a single plant. Though native to rocky woods and slopes, wild columbine thrives in average or even moist garden conditions. Hummingbirds love it! Self sows readily where happy.

Aquilegia canadensis 'Little Lanterns'
Common Name: Canadian columbine
Replacing Canyon Vista as our compact red-stemmed selection, Little Lanterns is short in stature, but free with flowers. Numerous pendant flowers in shades of red and yellow cover the plant in late spring. This selection resolves a few grievances that some have expressed about Aquilegia canadensis by having consistantly shorter stature and more intense color than the species.

Aquilegia canadensis 'Little Lanterns'
Common Name: Wild Columbine

'Little Lanterns' is a compact columbine that only grows 10" tall. Deep red and yellow nodding flowers top blue-green foliage for many weeks in spring. This is a good choice for shade gardens, woodland gardens, rock gardens and naturalized areas.

Aquilegia canadensis 'Pink Lanterns'
Common Name: Wild Columbine
A shorter version of the species, this pink-flowered form of Wild Columbine is delicate and lovely. The light pink color combines beautifully with other early and mid spring plants like Phlox divaricata and Iris cristata.

Aquilegia chrysantha 'Yellow Queen'
Common Name: Golden Columbine

‘Yellow Queen’ is a bushy, clump-forming perennial cultivar that typically grows 18-36” tall and features large (2-3”), upward facing, fragrant, bright yellow flowers with long, outward curving spurs. Flowers are generally a richer yellow than those of the species and appear in spring. The tri-ternate, almost fern-like, basal green foliage has a bluish tinge and superficially resembles that of meadow rue (Thalictrum).


Aquilegia flabellata 'Cameo'
Common Name: Fan Columbine

A dwarf columbine that only reaches 5-6” tall, ‘Cameo’ sports large 1.5” blooms in shades of white, blue, and pink. Flowering earlier than most columbines, the flowers are produced in abundance atop compact, vigorous plants in late spring. Great for the rock garden!


Aquilegia flabellata 'Mini-Star'
Common Name: Fan Columbine

‘Mini-Star’ is a very compact columbine that typically only grows to 6-9" tall. It is a bushy, clump-forming perennial that features short-spurred (incurved), nodding flowers with light to sky blue sepals and white petals. The bi-ternate to tri-ternate foliage is somewhat suggestive of meadow rue (Thalictrum). Flowers are produced in spring in rather large quantity for such a diminutive plant.


Aquilegia formosa
Common Name: Western Columbine

Deep red, horned nodding flowers with yellow centers float above bright green foliage on long, thin stems for weeks starting in late April. This plant loves partially to fully shaded woodland areas, is easy to grow, very adaptable and is a huge nectar source for native butterflies and hummingbirds.


Aquilegia olympica
Common Name: Columbine

This beautiful columbine species is rare in cultivation. Flowers are mostly blue with petals bleeding to clear white at the tips. Excellent addition to the rock garden. Native to Southern Russia, Turkey, and the Caucuses.


Aquilegia vulgaris 'Black Barlow'
Common Name: European Columbine, Granny's Nightcap

‘Black Nora’ is a beautiful dark-purple (nearly black) columbine that is similar in form to the highly popular double-flowering cultivar ‘Nora Barlow’. The intoxicating double flowers appear more like dahlias than columbines. The slightly nodding flowers appear in late spring and arise to approximately 14” tall.


Aquilegia vulgaris 'Clementine Red'
Common Name: European Columbine, Granny's Nightcap

This wonderful selection belongs to the Clementine series of columbines that boast large, spurless flowers that have a stronger resemblance to double Clematis or waterlilies (Nymphaea) than to traditional columbines. ‘Clementine Red’ bears vibrant fuchsia-red flowers that are irresistible to butterflies and hummingbirds! Large, upward facing flowers are also great as long lasting cut flowers.


Aquilegia vulgaris 'Dorothy Rose'
Common Name: European Columbine, Granny's Nightcap

'Dorothy Rose' bears delightful rose-pink flowers that arise 18-24” above bluish-green foliage. The exquisite double blooms appear as if several flowers are set inside one other; flower appearance lends the whimsical air of a ruffled ballerina's dress to your garden. Slightly nodding flowers in late spring gracefully dance in the slightest breeze.


Aquilegia vulgaris 'Winky Blue-White'
Common Name: European Columbine, Granny's Nightcap

The incredibly popular Winky Series of columbines have become cherished garden favorites in recent years. Renowned for their incredibly uniform growth and extended flowering habits, these columbines are also prized for their dwarf stature, only reaching 12-16” tall. The series was named for their upward-facing flowers (as if they are “winking” at you). This cultivar bears lovely blue and white, bi-colored flowers.


Aquilegia vulgaris 'Winky Red-White'
Common Name: European Columbine, Granny's Nightcap

‘Winky Red-White’ boasts radiant red and white, bi-colored flowers. The incredibly popular Winky Series of columbines have become cherished garden favorites in recent years. Renowned for their incredibly uniform growth and extended flowering habits, these columbines are also prized for their dwarf stature, only reaching 12-16” tall. The series was named for their upward-facing flowers (as if they are “winking” at you).


Aquilegia vulgaris 'Winky Rose'
Common Name: European Columbine, Granny's Nightcap

A floriferous cultivar with deep rose flowers, ‘Winky Rose’ will certainly brighten up your garden -without even wearing rose-colored glasses! It is one of the incredibly popular Winky Series of columbines that have become cherished garden favorites in recent years. Renowned for their incredibly uniform growth and extended flowering habits, these columbines are also prized for their dwarf stature, only reaching 12-16” tall. The series was named for their upward-facing flowers (as if they are “winking” at you).


Aquilegia vulgaris 'Woodside Strain'
Common Name: European Columbine, Granny's Nightcap

Finally! A variegated columbine! ‘Woodside Strain’ is a knock-out cultivar that sports purple, blue, and sometimes white flowers atop lush foliage marbled in gold and cream. The beautiful foliage extends the interest of this fine columbine well beyond the flowering season. Foliage coloration is most pronounced in moist sunny sites.


Aquilegia x 'Biedermeier'
Common Name: Hybrid Columbine
A graceful, old fashioned diminuative perennial with flowers in shades of pink, purple, light blue and white. Aquilegia is best planted where the fading leaves will be camouflaged by foliage of later emerging plants such as Heuchera, woodland Asters or ferns. It is beautiful when naturalized in a woodland setting and will self sow freely when happy.

Aquilegia x hybrida 'Mckana's Giant'
Common Name: Hybrid Columbine

The McKana series of columbine hybrids were originally released in the mid-1950s and have been highly popular ever since, bearing large flowers in a kaleidoscope of pastel colors on tall, upright plants. ‘McKana’s Giant’ has all the best qualities of its popular predecessor, but boasts even larger flowers on robust plants (reaching nearly 3’ tall). Flowers face outwards, are slightly nodding, and are produced in profusion for 4-6 weeks in late spring and early summer.


Aquilegia x hybrida 'Music White'
Common Name: Hybrid Columbine

A regal member of the popular Music Mix selection of columbines, ‘Music White’ bears large, clear white flowers on stems rising 2-3’ tall. Flowers are slightly nodding and have beautifully long spurs; great for cut flowers.


Aquilegia x hybrida 'Origami Blue & White'
Common Name: Hybrid Columbine

A beautiful selection that produces large 3”, blue and white flowers with long spurs from late spring into early summer. Prized for its tight, compact habit (only 15” tall), prolific-flowering, and upward-pointing flowers. Great for planters and rock gardens or for naturalizing in semi-shady woodlands.


Aquilegia x hybrida 'Origami Yellow'
Common Name: Hybrid Columbine

Another beautiful columbine in the Origami Series. Although having the classical columbine form, large (to 3”) flowers are bright yellow and, from a distance, can be mistaken for daffodils. Beautiful color contrast when inter-planted with grape hyacinths (Muscari). Prized for its compact size, extended bloom time, and large flowers. Great for planters and in the rock garden.


Arbutus menziesii
Common Name: Pacific Madrone

This tree has it all - colorful exfoliating bark, white flowers that attract hummingbirds and native woodland butterflies, bright red berries that feed the birds and other woodland critters in the fall and winter. Its deep roots tenaciously hold the soil making it a great erosion buffer.


Arctostaphylos uva-ursi 'Massachusetts'
Common Name: Common Bearberry

Common Bearberry is an evergreen groundcover that is suited to sandy or other well-drained soils with acidic pH. It can be a marvelous solution for a difficult site since it grows where few other plants are happy. Artostaphyllos is lovely draped over the edge of a wall or large rock. Its small green leaves have silver grey backs and often appear to be edged in silver.'Massachusetts' flowers and fruits abundantly and is a disease-resistant selection with smaller leaves than the species. Introduced by west coast growers, but seed for this selection originated in Massachusetts.

Arisaema ringens
Common Name: Japanese Cobra Lily
A most wonderful species, the tubers produce two leaves, each composed of three leaflets and an incurved contorted spathe which looks like a striped helmet. The hood of the spathe is deep chocolate color, while the white to yellow spadix is almost entirely enclosed. Plants are robust and produce some of the largest spathes relative to the overall size of the plant in this genus. ~Allan Armitage

Arisaema sikokianum
Common Name: Gaudy Jack
The beauty of this plant lies in the contrast of the purple spathe and the elegant white spadix. The spathe forms a funnel-shaped tube ending in a long, narrow projection. Inside the spathe nests the lovely, pestle-shaped spadix, easily visible in early spring. ~Allan Armitage

Arisaema triphyllum
Common Name: Jack-in-the-Pulpit
The jack-in-the-pulpit is a spring woodland wildflower usually growing 1- 2' tall. The flower structure consists of the spadix (Jack), which is an erect spike containing numerous inconspicuous flowers, and the sheath-like spathe (pulpit), which encases the lower part of the spadix and then opens to form a hood extending over the top of the spadix. The outside of the spathe is usually green or purple and the inside is usually striped purple and greenish white, though considerable color variations exist. Flowers emerge in spring, followed by red berries in fall, and are a welcome and beautiful addition to shade or woodland gardens.

Aristolochia macrophylla
Common Name: Dutchman's Pipe
This deciduous, woody, climbing vine is an eastern American native which typically occurs in the wild in rich, moist woods and along streams. Can rapidly grow to 20-30'. An old-fashioned favorite that is grown for its large, heart-shaped, densely overlapping leaves (6-12" long) which can quickly cover an arbor or trellis with attractive, glossy, deep green foliage. Commonly called Dutchman's pipe because the unusual, 2" long, yellowish-green flowers (each flaring at the calyx mouth to form 3 brownish-purple lobes) superficially resemble Dutch smoking pipes. Although the flowers make interesting conversation pieces, they are usually hidden by the dense foliage and are somewhat inconspicuous.

Aristolochia macrophylla
Common Name: Dutchman's Pipe

This deciduous woody vine is an old-fashioned favorite grown for its large, heart-shaped, glossy green leaves (6-12" long) which can quickly cover sun porches, verandas, pillars, posts, trellises, arbors, fences or walls. It is commonly called Dutchman's pipe because the unusual, 2" long flowers look something like Dutch smoking pipes. They are quite interesting so be sure to look behind the dense foliage, which usually hides them. This is the larval host plant for the blue and black pipevine swallowtail butterfly.

Benefits:

  • Grows quickly
  • Provides dense shade
  • Grows well in moist soil
  • Host plant for pipevine swallowtail butterfly

Armeria juniperifolia
Common Name: Pyrenees Sea Thrift
This adorable rock garden gem epitomizes the whimsical charm of alpine plants. The attractive, mounding, juniper-like foliage slowly spreads to form a densely-tufted mat idealy suited for rockeries, wall gardens, or planters. The large flowers, in comparison to its diminuative foliage, arise in late spring to early summer and completely envelop the foliage for an unforgettable show.

Armeria maritima 'Alba'
Common Name: Seathrift, Common Thrift
Beautiful white flowers, rare for the species, make for excellent cut and dried flowers. Plants form tufts of foliage that are attractive all year. Great for rock, wall, and trough gardens, as well as a welcome addition to winter/spring planters. Native to coastal regions in the northern hemisphere, these tough little plants are salt and cold tolerant.

Armeria maritima 'Bloodstone'
Common Name: Seathrift, Common Thrift
The cheery flowers of this plant are a vibrant magenta-red and are excellent cut and dried flowers. Plants form tufts of foliage that are attractive all year. Great for rock, wall, and trough gardens, as well as a welcome addition to winter/spring planters. Native to coastal regions in the northern hemisphere, these tough little plants are salt and cold tolerant.

Armeria maritima 'Dusseldorf Pride'
Common Name: Seathrift, Common Thrift
A low-growing, clump-forming, compact plant featuring small, carmine-red flowers in tight, globular clusters atop wiry, unbranched, 6-10" stems rising up from a dense, rounded mat of stiff, grass-like, dark green leaves, which slowly spread to 12" wide. Good cut flower. Great for rock, wall, and trough gardens, as well as a welcome addition to winter/spring planters. Native to coastal regions in the northern hemisphere, these tough little plants are salt and cold tolerant.

Armeria maritima 'Rubrifolia'
Common Name: Seathrift, Common Thrift
A low-growing, clump-forming, compact plant featuring small, rosy-pink flowers in tight, globular clusters atop wiry, unbranched, 6-10" stems rising up from a dense, rounded mat of stiff, grass-like, purplish-red leaves, which slowly spread to 12" wide. Good cut flower. Great for rock, wall, and trough gardens, as well as a welcome addition to winter/spring planters. Native to coastal regions in the northern hemisphere, these tough little plants are salt and cold tolerant.

Aronia arbutifolia 'Brilliantissima'
Common Name: (Photinia pyriflolia) Red Chokeberry

This deciduous shrub has it all! Fruit for the birds, nectar for insects, cover for wildlife and multi-season beauty. Clusters of spring blooming white to pinkish flowers provide loads of nectar for pollinators. Dense clusters of glossy red fruit follow the flowers. The fruit ripens in late summer and persists through winter. The glossy foliage turns brilliant red in autumn, making it a terrific alternative to the non-native, burning bush (Euonymus alatus).

Benefits:

  • Compact plant that makes an excellent hedge and provides cover for wildlife
  • This selection has lustrous foliage with superior red color in the fall
  • Abundance of large glossy fruit provides late season berries for birds
  • Prolific flowers provide nectar in spring for early butterflies and pollinators
  • Tolerant of a wide range of conditions including wet or poor soils

Aronia melanocarpa 'Viking'
Common Name: Viking Black Chokeberry

Upright and multi-branched, this plant's dark green, glossy leaves serve as the backdrop for heads of dainty white flowers in May that are a key native insect nectar source. Berries appear in summer and ripen to black in fall and are feasted on by songbirds.  Brilliant red fall color is striking.


Aruncus dioicus
Common Name: Goats Beard
Aruncus dioicus is a fantastic native with large, fine textured feathery blooms in late Spring. Though closely related to Spiraea, Goat's Beard more closely resembles a giant Astilbe. When happy Aruncus can be a formidable garden plant, reaching a spread of 6 feet or more. It is lovely when used at woods edge and it can provide a dense screen beneath a high canopy.

Aruncus dioicus
Common Name: Goat's Beard

Giant 20" plumes white flowers bloom starting in May above deep green, highly textured, Astilbe-like foliage. This semi-shade lover's huge flower plumes attracted masses of native insects and butterflies to the garden wile its easy care nature makes it a shade gardening natural for any landscape.


Arundo donax 'Variegata'
Common Name: Variegated Giant Reed

A large, upright, clump-forming grass which makes a striking addition to both herbaceous and shrub borders. This hardy and disease resistant plant has been used as a source for the reeds in woodwind instruments.


Asarum canadense
Common Name: Wild Ginger, Canadian Ginger

Wild ginger is a native spring wildflower that occurs in rich woodlands and wooded slopes. Basically a stemless plant, it features two downy, heart- to kidney-shaped, handsomely veined, dark green, basal leaves (to 6" wide). One of its most endearing traits is its tendency to ramble around the shaded garden once established, forming a lush colony that carpets the ground. Cup-shaped, purplish brown flowers (1" wide) appear in spring on short, ground-level stems between the two leaves. Although often hidden by the flowers, you will soon discover a favorite springtime passion of kneeling down to catch a glimpse of the flowers (which are quite attractive up close).


Asarum canadense
Common Name: Wild Ginger

Wild ginger is a native spring wildflower that makes a lovely groundcover with its satiny, heart-shaped leaves. Pollinated by ants, its unique purplish brown flowers appear beneath the leaves in spring. Flowers are quite attractive on close inspection, but are usually hidden from view by the foliage. The leaves of Asarum have a spicy fragrance when crushed, but shouldn't be eaten. The roots are edible and can be used as a flavoring like ginger.

Asarum europaeum
Common Name: European Wild Ginger

European wild ginger is an excellent, low-growing groundcover for the woodland garden, with glossy, dark green, evergreen, kidney-shaped leaves (2-3” wide). One of the best Asarum specimens for use as a ground cover -especially for filling in troublesome, shady spots. Its unusual purple-brown flowers lie mostly concealed beneath foliage.


Asarum splendens
Common Name: Chinese Wild Ginger

Splendid indeed! Chinese wild ginger is an outstanding foliage plant for the shady woodland garden or for edging the border. Forming clumps of arrowhead-shaped leaves that slowly spread to form dense ground-hugging colonies, it is a great groundcover. However, its most remarkable attribute is the fact that its luxuriant dark green leaves are marbled with silver markings, reminiscent of Cyclamen foliage. Deep purple-brown flowers hide among the leaves in spring. Evergreen in mild winter regions.


Asclepias curassavica
Common Name: Blood Flower
Asclepias curassavica is a tender perennial that grows upright and tall with spiraling lanceolate leaves. The flowers, in small scarlet red and orange umbels, are very bright and showy, and wonderful at attracting Monarch butterflies. Blood Flower is a milkweed and thus contains a milky sap that exudes from the foliage when cut or damaged.

Asclepias incarnata
Common Name: Swamp Milkweed
One of the most beautiful of native perennials with clusters of upturned pink flowers in June and July. Much underused in average gardens conditions! Attracts butterflies of all kinds. Willow-like leaves are 4-5" long. Occurs in floodplains and wet meadows.

Asclepias incarnata
Common Name: Swamp Milkweed

Swamp milkweed has big heads of rose pink, sweetly scented flowers. It's not unusual to see two or three butterflies on a single flower at the same time. Swamp milkweed grows naturally in wet soil but also grows well in regular garden soil.

Benefits:

  • Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds
  • Host and nectar plant for monarch butterflies
  • Lovely vanilla fragrance
  • Thrives in sun in average or moist soil
  • Deer resistant

Asclepias incarnata 'Cinderella'
Common Name: Swamp Milkweed

Although you might initially overlook her as simply “ordinary”… wait until she blooms! Just like its beautiful namesake, ‘Cinderella’ captivates all onlookers with its beauty when it begins to flower in mid-summer. Bearing exquisite, rosy-purple flowers in dense clusters atop 3’-4’ tall plants, this outstanding selection of the native swamp milkweed will be an enchanting addition to your garden. The vanilla-scented flowers last well in water and attract butterflies and hummingbirds.


Asclepias incarnata 'Ice Ballet'
Common Name: White Swamp Milkweed
A marvelous long-blooming, bright white selection of swamp milkweed. Clear white flowers and dark green foliage make the colors of the hundreds of visiting butterflies glisten in the sunlight.

Asclepias incarnata 'Soulmate'
Common Name: Swamp Milkweed

‘Soulmate’ is a fine selection of the native swamp milkweed and typically grows 3-3.5’ tall. An erect, clump-forming plant that that bears deep rose pink, mildly fragrant flowers (1/4” wide) in substantial clusters (3-4” wide). Flowers are followed by attractive slender seed pods (to 4” long) which split open when ripe and release to the wind silky-haired seeds. Seed pods are great in dried arrangements if picked just before opening. Flowers are very attractive to butterflies as a nectar source and this plant serves as a food source for the larval stage of Monarch butterflies.


Asclepias purpurascens
Common Name: Purple Milkweed
An exceptionally lovely native that is all too rare in cultivation, Purple Milkweed has intense rose pink flowers for several weeks in early to mid summer, followed by the attractive pods of silky seeds typical of the genus. Very tolerant of a wide variety of soils and light levels, it is easy to grow. Tolerates shade, but blooms better in the sun. Found from New Hampshire to North Carolina, west to Minnesota and Arkansas.

A good noninvasive substitute for the common milkweed, A. syriaca, in the garden. - Bill Cullina

Asclepias syriaca
Common Name: Common Milkweed
This native classic is best known as a food of larval monarch butterflies (along with it's siblings A. incarnata and A. tuberosa). Robust and stoloniferous with deep pink clusters of fragrant flowers in June and July, followed by lovely pods of silky seeds in October.

Asclepias tuberosa
Common Name: Butterfly Weed
A tough, drought-tolerant native with intense orange flowers in mid to late summer. Attracts many varieties of butterfly and is especially attractive to Monarchs. A beautiful solution for a dry sunny slope! Occurs in dry fields and roadsides in most of the US.

Asclepias tuberosa
Common Name: Butterfly Weed

Butterfly weed produces many bright orange, flat-topped flower clusters in early June. Flowering goes on for many weeks. Green pods full of seeds with silky white hairs follow the flowers. This is an essential plant if you want to attract a variety of butterflies to your property, especially monarchs.

Benefits:

  • Nectar and sometime host plant for monarch butterflies
  • Great nectar source for many other butterflies
  • Thrives in sun in average or dry soil
  • Deer resistant

Asclepias tuberosa 'Gay Butterflies'
Common Name: Butterfly Weed

‘Gay Butterflies’ is a beautiful butterfly weed cultivar that produces a profusion of flowers in fiery shades of red, orange, and yellow from June through July. It is an ideal nectar source for all types of butterflies and the preferred food source for monarch butterfly larvae. Typically grows 24-30” tall. Flowers give way to prominent spindle-shaped seed pods in late summer that split open when ripe to release numerous silky-tailed seeds for wind dispersal.


Asclepias tuberosa 'Hello Yellow'
Common Name: Butterfly Weed

This cultivar of butterfly weed features flat-topped clusters (umbels) of bright yellow flowers atop upright stems (2-3’ tall) with narrow, lance-shaped leaves. Flowers give way to prominent 3-6” long seed “pods” (technically follicles) that are valued in dried flower arrangements. Long summer bloom period. The nectar of the flowers are attractive to all butterflies, but the plant specifically also serves as the host plant for monarch butterfly larvae.


Asclepias tuberosa 'Hello Yellow'
Common Name: Butterfly Weed

Hello Yellow Butterfly Weed produces many golden yellow, flat-topped flower clusters in early June. Flowering goes on for many weeks. Green pods full of seeds with silky white hairs follow the flowers. This is an essential plant if you want to attract a variety of butterflies to your property, especially monarchs.

Benefits:

  • Nectar and sometime host plant for monarch butterflies
  • Great nectar source for many other butterflies
  • Thrives in sun in average or dry soil
  • Deer resistant

Asclepias verticillata
Common Name: Horsetail Milkweed
A widely adaptable and tough native is a deer-resistant food for larval butterflies. The fine-textured foliage provides a dark green backdrop for the clusters of white flowers that appear in June and July.

Aster azureus
Common Name: Sky Blue Aster

This hardy native plant lights up the autumn garden with it's brilliant pale blue blooms. Found throughout the tallgrass prairie, Sky Blue Aster is found in a wide variety of locations from wet meadows to dry gravel outcrops. This is good news for the gardener because it will be happy in any sunny location! Attractive to butterflies and other nectar-loving insects.

Aster cordifolius
Common Name: Blue Wood Aster
Clouds of blue flowers in early fall in shade! A great nuturalizer under trees, at the edge of woods, or as a filler among Hostas and Astilbes, which look pretty rough by September. Found in woods and dry meadows.

Aster cordifolius 'Avondale'
Common Name: Wood Aster
This selection of the native Wood Aster is a prolific bloomer and carpets the shade garden with light blue in early fall, when little else blooms and the hostas are in decline. A quick and easy pot crop for fall sales. Beautiful and long-lasting as a filler in autumn flower arrangements!

Aster divaricatus
Common Name: White Wood Aster
Produces a fairtland of glistening of small white daisies in September and October. Lovley naturalized in shade, average, and dry soil. Found in deciduous woods and along roadsieds of the Eastern US.

Aster divaricatus
Common Name: (Eurybia divaricata) Woodland Aster

Asters are the backbone of many late summer and fall landscapes. The white woodland aster is a terrific ground cover and is especially valuable because it grows so well in dry shade. Thin, nearly black stems are topped with clouds of white flowers in early fall. Benefits:
  • Nectar plant for butterflies and other pollinators
  • Seed source for songbirds
  • Provides nesting material for birds
  • Grows in sun or dry shade
  • Great ground cover

  • Aster divaricatus 'Eastern Star'
    Common Name: White Wood Aster
    We have grown this select form anonymously for many years and have deemed it worthy of a name. It is shorter than the species and has deep dark shining mahogany stems. It came our way from Canyon Creek Nursery, via Roger Rache, then of the Berkley Botanic Gardens's Eastern US section. Originally collected from coastal Rhode Island.

    Aster ericoides 'Snow Flurry'
    Common Name: Heath Aster
    A very low dense carpeting groundcover that is smothered with 1/2" single white flowers with gold centers in September. A good strong grower and a totally new look and use for Asters! Makes an excellent container plant.

    Aster laevis 'Bluebird'
    Common Name: Smooth Aster
    'Bluebird' is a superlative selection of the native Smooth Aster introduced by Dr. Richard Lighty of the Mt.Cuba Center. This tall vased-shaped wildflower has large 1" diameter blue flowers held in cloud-like clusters at the tips of the arching branches. You can pinch back the young shoots in June for denser habit and more flowers, but it is not essential. Staking is helpful by late summer if you forget to pinch. Perfectly clean foliage makes for easy maintenance in production and in the landscape. Aster laevis is a great source of nectar for migrating monarchs and other late season butterflies.

    Aster laevis 'Bluebird'
    Common Name: Smooth Aster

    Smooth Aster, Symphyotrichum laeve, has big cone-shaped clusters of violet-blue flowers with golden yellow centers that appear on the top half of a vase shaped clump. Unlike many other asters, this one has perfectly clean foliage. Tolerates a variety of soil types and moisture levels, and it needs no staking in full sun. Benefits:
    • Attracts butterflies and a variety of native bees
    • Drought tolerant
    • Clean foliage all season
    • Does not need to be staked

    Aster lateriflorus 'Lady in Black'
    Common Name: Calico Aster
    Who can resist plants with great names? Aster 'Lady in Black' is an elegant 3-4' mound of purplish- black strappy leaves smothered in red-centered tiny white daisies in late summer and early fall. A stronger, more statuesque sister of Aster 'Prince' that will thrive in average soil in sun or part shade, but shows best foliage coloration in full sun. Thousands of flowers per plant - a butterfly's dream!

    Aster novae-angliae
    Common Name: New England Aster
    Tall and majestic, New England Aster rules the prairie in autumn. The deep blue to purple, and sometimes pink flowers are highlights of the late season wildflower garden. Blooms late into the fall, well after the first frosts. This is a critical late season nectar source for butterflies, especially for Monarchs, as they stock up for their long migration to Mexico.- Prarie Nursery

    Aster novae-angliae 'Alma Potchke'
    Common Name: (Symphyotrichum n.a.) New England Aster

    Selected many years ago in Germany, this New England Aster produces warm, deep pink blooms without interruption for 4-6 weeks, beginning in early September. A bright color for the fall garden, it provides nectar for butterflies and cover for birds and other small animals.

    Aster novae-angliae 'Alma Potschke'
    Common Name: New England Aster
    Bright rose pink flowers in early fall, September for us here in Pennsylvania.

    Aster novae-angliae 'Purple Dome'
    Common Name: New England Aster
    A naturally compact form with deep purple flowers in August and September. Eye-popping with Solidago 'Golden Fleece'. One of the most garden-worthy native selections out there. A fine introduction from the Mt. Cuba Center.

    Aster novae-angliae 'Purple Dome'
    Common Name: (Symphyotrichum n.a.) New England Aster

    'Purple Dome' is a compact bushy plant with a profusion of dark purple, semi-double flowers which cover the plant entirely from September thru October.

    Aster novae-angliae 'Vibrant Dome'
    Common Name: Vibrant Dome New England Aster
    Vibrant, hot-pink, star-shaped flowers with yellow center accents adorn lance-shaped green foliage through autumn. The compact, mounding habit of this sport of Aster 'Purple Dome' has proven mildew resistance. Reaching between 15 and 20 inches, A. 'Vibrant Dome' performs best in fertile, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. A beautiful performer for late season color.

    Aster novae-belgii
    Common Name: New York Aster
    Local midatlantic native of moist to wet meadows. Flowers in shades of blue and purple in early fall, which is late August and early September here in PA.

    Aster oblongifolius 'October Skies'
    Common Name: Aromatic Aster
    Shorter, bushier, bluer sister of 'Raydon's Favorite'. A strong growing low mound of bushy foliage covered in lavender blue flowers in mid fall. Highly tolerant of drought and poor soils. This Primrose Path introduction has excellent groundcover potential.

    Aster oblongifolius 'Raydon's Favorite'
    Common Name: Aromatic Aster
    Medium blue, fine textured single ray flowers in September and October, aromatic foliage. Irresistable, a really tremendous plant. Introduced by Holbrook Farm.

    Aster tataricus 'Jindai'
    Common Name: Tatarian Daisy
    Large leaves (to 2') emerge in the spring and provide a bold backdrop for earlier blooming perennials. In the fall numerous flower stalks rise to 4 or 5 feet and each is covered with 1" pink daisy-like flowers. Flowering is later than many other asters and this species often provides brilliant color until frost. Found by Rick Darke and Skip March at the Jin Dai Botanical Garden. This cultivar is shorter than the species and less likely to require staking.

    Aster x 'Wood's Pink'
    Common Name: Pink Wood's Aster
    Aster Wood's Pink is virtually mildew and rust free. Like all the Wood's Asters, it is a wonderful container plant, with a compact habit and unstoppable clear pink flowers with gold centers. Bred for compact habit, long bloom period and heavy flowering, all of the Woods Asters are outstanding pot crops and should be used far more often as a sturdy perennial alternative for mums.

    Aster x 'Wood's Purple'
    Common Name: Purple Wood's Aster
    Aster 'Wood's Purple' has perfectly clean foliage, and is loaded with single, clear purple flowers in late summer and early fall. It is slightly earlier than 'Wood's Blue'. Bred for compact habit, long bloom period and heavy flowering, all of the Woods Asters are outstanding pot crops and should be used far more often as a sturdy perennial alternative for mums.

    Aster x 'Woods Light Blue'
    Common Name: Blue Wood's Aster
    This member of the Wood's Aster group has the typical low rounded habit and profuse blooming associated with all three. 'Wood's Blue' has perfectly clean foliage, and in the early fall it is covered with clear medium blue flowers with gold centers. Bred for compact habit, long bloom period and heavy flowering, all of the Woods Asters are outstanding pot crops and should be used far more often as a sturdy perennial alternative for mums.

    Aster x frikartii 'Monch'
    Common Name: Frikart's Aster
    Elegant, cool lavender-blue single flowers with gold centers occur on upright, freely branching stems. It blooms earlier than most asters, starting in early August. A tremendous performer!

    Asteromea mongolica
    Common Name: Japanese Aster
    Tough and easy to grow, this enchanting aster cousin is covered in hundreds of double white flowers from mid-summer to frost. Undemanding by nature, it is ideal for most any sunny garden spot and is a great container plant. Fantastic flower in arrangements too, easier to grow and lasts longer than Baby's Breath.

    Astilbe chinensis 'Maggie Daley'
    Common Name: Chinese Astilbe

    An excellent perennial for lightly shaded areas. New growth is bronze tinted, then dark green as it matures. Like all astilbes, this fine specimen lends a refined presence to semi-shady perennial borders and graceful flowers flutter in the slightest summer breeze. Mid to late summer blooms are lavender-purple. This particular cultivar blooms later than other Astilbe.


    Astilbe chinensis 'Pumila'
    Common Name: Chinese Astilbe

    This dwarf variety spreads more quickly than most other Chinese astilbes. It features a foliage mound to 6” tall of dark green leaves and thick, stiff panicles of lilac-pink flowers on 9-12” tall stems in early to mid-summer.


    Astilbe chinensis 'Purpurkerze'
    Common Name: Chinese Astilbe

    ‘Purpurkerze’ is a tall upright cultivar that forms a foliage mound (to 24” tall) of dark green leaves. Dark purplish red flowers in thick panicles bloom in early summer atop branching stems rising to 42” tall. Flower color softens to lighter shades of purple with age.


    Astilbe chinensis 'Visions'
    Common Name: Chinese Astilbe

    ‘Visions’ is a compact cultivar which features a foliage mound (to 9” tall) of bronze-green leaves and thick panicles of raspberry flowers on 12-15” tall stems in late spring to early summer.


    Astilbe chinensis var. taquetii 'Superba'
    Common Name: Chinese Astilbe

    This giant Astilbe is a bold, very tall plant which features a dark green foliage mound to 24” tall and large, dense panicles of deep lilac flowers on hairy stems rising 4-5’ tall. Blooms in mid- to late-summer, extending the flowering season of astilbes past their typical season.


    Astilbe simplicifolia 'Aphrodite'
    Common Name: Star Astilbe

    One of the larger cultivars of this typically-dwarf species, ‘Aphrodite’ lives up to its Greek-goddess namesake with an elegance and whimsy perfect for any semi-shady spot. Striking salmon-red flowers arise nearly 2’ tall and contrast well against the dark green leaves. Flower plumes are more upright in this cultivar as compared to the more typical arching habit of other selections.


    Astilbe simplicifolia 'White Sensation'
    Common Name: Star Astilbe

    A heavy flowering selection, ‘White Sensation’ certainly lives up to its name. Feathery, bright white flower plumes are held above rich, glossy green foliage in summer. This specimen is equally beautiful when planted en masse for a large swathe of white to brighten a shady spot or when planted in smaller clumps as specimens positioned in the perennial border. Graceful flowers flutter in the slightest breeze and make for great cut flowers.


    Astilbe x arendsii 'August Light'
    Common Name: False Spirea

    ‘August Light’ is noted for its scarlet red flowers. It blooms later than most other arendsii hybrids. It typically forms a foliage mound to 12-20” tall and as wide with panicles of fluffy deep scarlet red flowers appearing in summer on upright stems rising to 30-36” tall.


    Astilbe x arendsii 'Bridal Veil'
    Common Name: False Spirea

    The archetypal white Astilbe, this beautiful gem brightens up any shady spot. Fluffy flower plumes are branched and droop at the tips for an elegant appearance.


    Astilbe x arendsii 'Catherine Deneuve'
    Common Name: False Spirea

    Named for the elegant French actress and model, this beautiful Astilbe is a medium-sized hybrid cultivar that features large, dense, conical panicles of carmine-rose flowers on upright stems (2.5 to 3’ tall). It typically forms a foliage mound of medium green leaves to 18” high. Flowers bloom late spring to early summer.  Like all astilbes, this fine specimen lends a refined presence to semi-shady perennial borders and graceful flowers flutter in the slightest early summer breeze.


    Astilbe x arendsii 'Cattleya'
    Common Name: False Spirea

    ‘Cattleya’ is a tall cultivar which features large panicles of bright orchid pink flowers on upright stems (to 3.5’ tall). Typically forms a foliage mound to 12-15” high. Leaves emerge tinged with red but mature to dark green. This cultivar was named for the popular orchid genus. Flowers bloom mid- to late- summer.  Like all astilbes, this fine specimen lends a refined presence to semi-shady perennial borders and graceful flowers flutter in the slightest summer breeze.


    Astilbe x arendsii 'Color Flash'
    Common Name: False Spirea

    Like all astilbes, ‘Color Flash’ bears beautiful flowers. However, this fantastic new cultivar is most noted for its beautiful foliage color. New leaves emerge a vivid electric-green color in early spring and mature to a painter’s palette of burgundy, purple, and green throughout the summer. If that weren’t enough, in autumn, the leaves transition to a brilliant mixture of gold, orange, and rust tones.


    Astilbe x arendsii 'Darwin's Dream'
    Common Name: False Spirea

    ‘Darwin’s Dream’ is a compact, upright, mounded Astilbe that features deep pink, branched flower plumes in early summer to 18” tall. Mostly basal, compound glossy dark green leaves form a dense, fern-like foliage mound (to 10” tall).


    Astilbe x arendsii 'Deutschland'
    Common Name: False Spirea

    ‘Deutschland’ features a foliage mound (to 18” tall) of lustrous green leaves and upright panicles of pure white flowers on stems rising to 2’ tall in late spring. Like all astilbes, this fine specimen lends a refined presence to semi-shady perennial borders and graceful flowers flutter in the slightest early summer breeze.


    Astilbe x arendsii 'Erica'
    Common Name: False Spirea

    ‘Erica’ is a tall hybrid cultivar which features open, narrow panicles of soft pink flowers on upright stems (to 3’ tall). Flowers bloom late spring to early summer and make for great cut flowers. Foliage mounds typically rise to 18” high, with foliage emerging reddish bronze and maturing to dark green. This cultivar was named for the heather genus of the same name and similar flower color. Like all astilbes, this fine specimen lends a refined presence to semi-shady perennial borders and graceful flowers flutter in the slightest summer breeze.


    Astilbe x arendsii 'Etna'
    Common Name: False Spirea

    With feathery, dark red flower plumes above dark green foliage, ‘Etna’ is a welcome addition to any garden. This specimen is equally beautiful when planted en masse for a large swathe of red in spring or planted in smaller clumps as specimens positioned in the perennial border. Graceful flowers flutter in the slightest breeze and make for great cut flowers.


    Astilbe x arendsii 'Europa'
    Common Name: False Spirea

    Named for a beautiful Phoenician princess from Greek mythology, ‘Europa’ is an early blooming hybrid cultivar which bears airy plumes of pale pink flowers reaching 2’ high. Breathtaking when planted en masse for an airy swathe of baby pink in your late spring garden. Also charming when planted in smaller clumps as specimens positioned in the perennial border. Graceful flowers flutter in the slightest breeze and make for great cut flowers.


    Astilbe x arendsii 'Fanal'
    Common Name: False Spirea

    First introduced in 1933, ‘Fanal’ remains today one of the most popular Astilbe cultivars. Blood red flowers, perhaps the deepest red of any cultivar, are borne above bronze foliage in early summer. It is also a compact cultivar that typically only reaches 15-18” in height. Foliage emerges bronze but tends to turn dark green with a reddish tint as the summer progresses.


    Astilbe x arendsii 'Rheinland'
    Common Name: False Spirea

    ‘Rheinland’ typically forms a dark green foliage mound (to 9-12” tall) with open panicles of clear pink flowers appearing on upright, reddish stems (to 24” tall). Like all astilbes, this fine specimen lends a refined presence to semi-shady perennial borders and graceful flowers flutter in the slightest summer breeze.


    Astilbe x arendsii 'Snowdrift'
    Common Name: False Spirea

    ‘Snowdrift’ features a foliage mound to 18” tall of deeply-cut, medium green leaves and wide, feather-like panicles of pure white flowers on erect stems typically rising to 24” tall in late spring. Like all astilbes, this fine specimen lends a refined presence to semi-shady perennial borders and its graceful flowers flutter in the slightest late spring or early summer breeze.


    Astilbe x arendsii 'White Gloria'
    Common Name: False Spirea

    Typical of the astilbes in the Gloria series, this early-flowering specimen features compact flower plumes that are less airy than is typical of other astilbes. It works well as a container plant if soil is kept sufficiently moist.


    Astilbe x rosea 'Peach Blossom'
    Common Name: Rose Astilbe

    Attractive foliage mounds (to 18” tall) of rich, medium green leaves and wide panicles of peach-pink flowers that typically arise to 2-3’ tall in late spring.


    Athyrium filix-femina
    Common Name: Lady Fern
    Handsome crowns of feathery fronds are typical of this genus. Delicate and lacy with arching fronds and dark red stems at maturity. Strong-growing and dependable, the Lady Ferns are great garden plants. Tough and easy to grow, this beauty is the right choice for perennial borders and woodlands alike. A breathtaking flush of new fronds appears in the spring, with new leaves appearing throughout the season for a continuously fresh look. Found in swamps, thickets and damp woods east of the Rockies.

    Athyrium filix-femina
    Common Name: Lady Fern
    Handsome crowns of feathery fronds are typical of Lady Ferns. Delicate and lacy with arching fronds and feathery texture, Athyrium filix-femina is a strong-growing and dependable garden plant. Tough and easy to grow, this beauty is the right choice for perennial borders and woodlands alike. A breathtaking flush of new fronds appears in the spring, with new leaves appearing throughout the season for a continuously fresh look. Lady fern is tolerant of drought, but survives by allowing foliage to die back until the next season.

    Athyrium filix-femina 'Lady in Red'
    Common Name: Lady Fern
    Strong-growing and dependable, the Lady Ferns are great garden plants. This selection from the New England Wildflower Society features red stems, making it a great choice to combine with purple-leaved plants. Tough and easy to grow, this sultry beauty is the right choice for perennial borders and woodlands alike. A breathtaking flush of new fronds appears in the spring, with new leaves appearing throughout the season for a continuously fresh look.

    Athyrium filix-femina 'Lady in Red'
    Common Name: Red-stemmed Lady Fern

    'Lady in Red' has sultry red stems surrounded by bright green, lacy fronds. New fronds arise gracefully from the crown all season long, keeping plants from getting worn looking. Clumps are dense and upright. This deciduous fern is vigorous and easy to grow. Ferns provide seasonal cover and hiding places for ground frequenting birds such as ovenbirds, waterthrushes, wood thrushes, robins and Carolina wrens.

    Athyrium filix-femina 'Victoriae'
    Common Name: Victoria Lady Fern
    "This is the most spectacular of all cultivars in its magnificent frond architecture. It is really the Queen of Green", according to Dr. John Mickel former curator of ferns at the New York Botanical Garden and author of "Ferns for American Gardens". As with other forms of lady ferns there is so much variability with spore production that it is necessary to produce this form in tissue culture, so its clones are identical to the parent. This superb selection has fronds whose pinnae (leaflets) crisscross to form x's and has crested pinnae tips. Another superior cultivar in the Mickel Collection ™.

    Athyrium nipponicum 'Pictum'
    Common Name: Japanese Painted Fern
    The most colorful fern around with subtle shades of green, purple and red on a grey-blue background. The color is more intense with some direct sun, preferably morning or late afternoon. Strong-growing and dependable, the Lady Ferns are great garden plants. Native to China, Korea and Japan.

    Athyrium nipponicum 'Regal Red'
    Common Name: Japanese Painted Fern
    Handsome and ruffled, this high-color selection has been a much requested Japanese Painted Fern. The dark violet red interior of each 'Regal Red' frond is contrasted by bright silver edges making each leaflet distinct and creating an overall tapestry effect. The pinnules also twist a little giving the frond a "fluffed" up look. 'Regal Red' combines beautifully with red-purple Heucheras such as 'Plum Pudding' and blue sedges like Carex platyphylla or C. 'Blue Zinger'. The fronds work well in cut flower arrangements, providing lasting color and soft texture. Unique and beautiful!

    Athyrium x 'Branford Rambler'
    Common Name: Running Lady Fern
    This is a good, frisky new fern from John Mickel of Bradford, CT. It has been billed as a running painted fern, but we have found it to be mostly green with red tones along the stem. Even so, it is a lovely and vigorous plant with delicate bright green fronds; a lively groundcover that is very easy to grow and not at all fussy; a deciduous, noninvasive creeper that fills in quickly, but doesn't take over. Hybridized by the legendary Nick Nicou, of Branford, CT.

    Athyrium x 'Ghost'
    Common Name: Ghost Fern
    From the garden of Virginia's Nancy Swell comes this stunning Lady Fern with silver-white fronds and a decidedly upright habit. Leaves age to light green with new fronds appearing throughout the season. Upright with a beautiful formal appearance that really stands out in the shady garden. This fern really prefers shade and will stand up with all fronds perpendicular to the ground in full sun.